"shared solutions for common problems"

Aim and Scope

Selection Process

Editorial Board

JNCOLCTL Advisory Editorial Board

Instructions for the  Authors

Call for Papers

Recent Editions

Past Editions

 Subscription information  and Links 

Open Access Statement 

Aim and Scope

The Journal of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages, published annually by the Council, is dedicated to the issues and concerns related to the teaching and learning of Less Commonly Taught Languages. The Journal primarily seeks to address the interests of language teachers, administrators, and re-searchers. Articles that describe in¬novative and successful teaching methods that are relevant to the con¬cerns or problems of the profes-sion, or that report educational research or experimentation in Less Commonly Taught Languages are welcome. Papers presented at the Council’s annual conference will be considered for publication, but additional manuscripts from members of the pro¬fes¬sion are also welcome.

Selection process information

The submissions are evaluated using a double-blind peer review process. Each paper is sent to at least two reviewers and only those with two positive evaluations (accept or accept with changes) are included in the Journal. Each paper is assigned to at least one specialist of the language addressed in the paper and one “generalist”, i.e., an expert in other less commonly taught language. All references to the author(s) are removed before the submission is sent to the reviewers and all references to the reviewers are removed when their comments are sent to the author(s)

Editorial board

Besides the Journal Editor, the process of selecting material for publication is overseen by the Advisory Editorial Board, which consists of the foremost scholars, advocates, and practitioners of LCTL pedagogy. The members of the Board represent diverse linguistic and geographical categories, as well as the academic, government, and business sectors.

JNCOLCTL Advisory Editorial Board

Elizabeth M. Bergman
Miami University of Ohio, Arabic
 
Richard Brecht
University of Maryland and NFCL, Russian and Language Advocacy
 
Stephane Charitos
Columbia University, Language Technology, Greek
 
Victor Friedman
University of Chicago, Balkans and Caucasus Languages
 
Michael Hillmann
University of Texas-Austin, Farsi, Tajik
 
Scott McGinnis
Defense Language Institute, Washington DC, Chinese


Instructions for the Authors

Submitted Manuscripts

subIn preparing the manuscript, please use the latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), see http://www.apastyle.org/manual/index.aspx

Manuscripts should be:

  •  A maximum of 20 pages (excluding references, charts, notes, etc.) and submitted electronically via word (1997-2003)-document e-mail attachment.
  •  Double-line spaced throughout, including notes, references, and tables, using 12-point Times New Roman font with a 1.5 inch left margin. (Please ensure that this specified formatting is followed).
  • Accompanied by a 150 word (or less) abstract and a cover sheet containing the manuscript title, name, address, office and home telephone numbers, fax number, email address, and full names and institutions of each author. (Because the manuscript will be blind reviewed, identifying information should be on the cover sheet only, and not appear in the manuscript).

All Manuscripts should be electronically submitted 

submit


Subscription information  and Links

Subscriptions and address changes to the journal should be sent to Dr. Antonia Schleicher, National African Language Resource Center, 708 Eigenmann Hall, 1900 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47406. You may want to subscribe online HERE

Subscription Rates:

            1 Year              Individual        U.S. $60

                        1 Year              Institutional     U.S. $200

Open Access Statement

This journal is available online to the reader without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself.    

Authors are not charged for the publication of their article(s) in the journal


Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


JNCOLCTL Volume 19 Spring 2016

  1.   The Role of Writing in Learning Less-commonly-taught Languages in Turkey   Nur Yigitoglu  
  2.   Integrating the Genre-Based Approach into Teaching Writing in Arabic As a Foreign Language    Mahmoud Azaz  
  3.   The Effectiveness of Diagnostic Assessment on the Development of Turkish Language Learners’ Narrative Skills as an Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) Task    Anjel Tozcu  
  4.   Trans-forming Students into Digital Hakawati: Digital Storytelling in the AFL Classroom: Learners’ Attitudes and Recommendations   Gaby Semaan, Dany Doueiri, & Rebecca Cuevas   
  5.   Dialogue Recitation and CFL Learners’ Production of Formulaic Expressions    Jia Yang  
  6.   Correla-tion of Proficiency with Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency in Spoken and Written Production: Evidence from L2 Korean   Youngjoo Kim, Juyeon Nam, & Sun-Young Lee  
  7.   Blended Learning Course Format on Moodle: A Model for Beginner Level Foreign Language Courses in Higher Education Reviews    Deborah Azaryad Shechter  
  8.   Toward a Task-based Textbook for Indonesian Lan-guage Learning    Jessica Fox  

JNCOLCTL Volume 18 Fall 2015

  1.   Teaching Linguistics to Supplement the Implementation of the Five Cs   Hongyuan Dong  
  2.   Research-Informed Online Language Course Design and Development for Least Commonly Taught LTCLs: The case of Introductory Dari, Pashto, and Uyghur   Öner Özçelik and Amber Kennedy Kent  
  3.   Foreign language teaching: A study of teachers’ be-liefs about effective teaching and learning methodologies   Farid Saydee  
  4.   College-Level Arabic Heritage Learners: Do they belong in Separate Classrooms?   Hana Zabarah  
  5.   Task-based incidental vocabulary learning in L2 Arabic: The role of proficiency and task performance   Ayman A. Mohamed  
  6.   Investigating the validity of KFL text difficulty as defined by the ILR Reading Scales   Sun-Young Shin  

JNCOLCTL Volume 17 Spring 2015

     1.       Uncovering Curriculum: Language performance through culture by design   Jennifer Eddy  
  2.   Foreign Language Read-ing Anxiety: Korean as a Foreign Language in the United States   Kin Young Joo & Julie Damron  
  3.   High School Students Reg-istered in Ukrainian Language Arts – What Practitioners and Learning Resource Developers Should Know   Olenka Bilash & Vitaliy Shyyan  
  4.   A Model for Com-munity-based Language Teaching to Young Learners: The Impact of University Outreach   Martha Nyikos & Vesna Dimitrieska  
  5.   Implementing STARTALK-endorsed Principles in an Intensive Summer LCTL Program: Challenges and Implications   Julian ChengChiang Chen & Sarah Jourdain  
  6.   Evaluating the Quality of STARTALK Program for Teaching Heritage and Non-Heritage Arabic Language Learners   Wafa Hassan  
  7.   Technology Training in Chinese Language Teacher Education: Content, Concept, and Context   Yang Xiao-Desai, Ka F. Wong & Xiaohui Wu  
             

JNCOLCTL Volume 16 Fall 2014   

   1.     Corrective Feedback in Classrooms at Different Proficiency Levels - A Case Study of Chinese as a For-eign Language    Liu Li
  2.   Errors in the Production of Adult Early and Late Bilinguals    Teresa Lee
  3.   Teachers’ and Non-Teachers’ Percep-tions of a Chinese Learner’s Oral Performances   Guangyan Chen
  4.   Loss of Culture, Loss of Language: An Afghan-American Community   Farid Saydee
  5.   The Development of a National Curriculum Guide for Persian: Themes, Genres, Standards-based Goals, and Models   Nicole Mills & Pardis Minuchehr
  6.   Korean Language Teachers in Higher Education in North America: Profile, Status and More   Hye-Sook Wang

 


JNCOLCTL Volume 15 Spring 2014

      1.     Teaching Norwegian to Beginers: Six Principles to Guide Lesson Planning    By Anna Krulatz
  2. Informal Language Learning and Self-Instruction: The Learning Ecosystem of Learners of Macedonian   Biljana Belamaric Wilsey
  3. Developing Linguistic and Professional Competence: Business Ukrainian On-line    Alla Nedashkivska
  4. Content-based Persian Language Instruction at the University of Maryland: A Field Report    Ali Reza Abasi
  5. Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Study of Chinese Language Learners    Han Luo
  6. The Arabic Language Fog of War: Exploring Iraq War Veterans' Motivations to Study Arabic Language and Culture Post Deployment    Jennifer Nichols
  7. Meso-American Languages: An Investigationof Variet, Maintenance, and Implications for Linguistic Survival    Ransom Gladwin

 JNCOLCTL Volume 14 Fall 2013

        1.    Variation among heritage speakers: Sequential vs. simultaneous bilinguals      Teresa Lee 
  2.    Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages   Masako Nunn
  3.   Effectiveness of deep, blended language learning as measured by oral proficiency and course evaluation   Francois Victor Tochon
  4.   A Language Socialization Approach to Uzbek Language Learning   Baburhan Uzum
  5.     Language classroom risk-taking behavior in a performed culture-based program   Stephen D. Luft

JNCOLCTL Volume 13 Spring 2013

       

1.

 

LCTL teachers’ assessment knowledge and practices: An exploratory study    Megan Montee, Aileen Bach, Anne Donovan, Lynn Thompson
  2.    Survey of Digital Materials for Teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages   Barbara Blankenship and Thomas J. Hinnebusch
  3.   Cognitive Perspective in SLA: Pedagogical Implications for Enhancing Oral Proficiency in Foreign Languages   Serafima Gettys, Iwona Lech
  4.   Making Vocabulary Corporeal: Arabic Learners, Vocabulary Development, & arabiCorpus   Amy Johnson, Mike Raish
  5.   The signal and comprehension approach: decoding and meaning building   Rajaa Aquil
  6.     Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) Students’ Lexical Tonal Development: An Investigation of Tonal Production and Awareness of Tonal Categories   Li Jin

JNCOLCTL Volume 12 Fall 2012

    

1. 

   Personality, motivation, and language attitudes of learners of CTLs and LCTLs    Mingzhen Bao and Lucia Lee
  2.   Teaching the Five Cs with Cinema   Rimma Garn
  3.   Heritage and Non-Heritage Language Learners in Arabic Classrooms: Inter and Intra-group Beliefs, Attitudes and Perceptions   Ghazi Abuhakema
  4.   Community-level Language Planning for Chinese Heritage Language Maintenance in the United States   An Chung Cheng
  5.   Exploring Mobile Technologies for Learning Chinese   Jing Wang and Christine H. Leland
  6.   Korean Language Studies: Motivation and Attrition   Julie Damron and Justin Forsyth

JNCOLCTL Volume 11 Spring 2012

    1.     Prioritizing African Languages: Challenges to macro-level planning for resourcing and capacity building    Tristan M. Purvis, Christopher R. Green, & Gregory K. Iverson
  2.   Independence, Interaction, Interdependence and Interrelation:Learner Autonomy in a Web-based Less Commonly Taught Language Classroom   Marina V. Kostina
  3.   Second Language Writing System Word Recognition (with a focus on Lao)   Christine Elliott
  4.   Revisiting songs in Language Pedagogy   Rajaa Aquil
   5.   Arabic Heritage Language Learners: motivation, expectations, competence, and engagement in learning Arabic   Ghassan Husseinali
  6.   The Impact of Standard Spoken Tamil in Singapore Tamil classroom   Seetha Lakshmi

 

Journal of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages
Call for Paper
 
Submission Deadline
November 1, 2016

       Call for Spring 2017 Journal Paper

 

The Journal of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages (JNCOLCTL) is soliciting articles for publication.

The Journal, published annually by NCOLCTL, is dedicated to the issues and concerns related to the teaching and learning of Less Commonly Taught Languages. The Journal primarily seeks to address the interests of language teachers, administrators, and researchers. Arti­cles that describe in­novative and successful teaching methods that are relevant to the con­cerns or problems of the profession, or that report educational research or experimentation in Less Common­ly Taught Lan­guages are welcome. Papers presented at NCOLCTL's annual conference will be considered for publication, but additional manuscripts from members of the pro­fes­sion are also welcome 

Our general editorial focus is on policy, education, programs, advocacy, and research in the field of Less commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs). The envisioned coverage of the journal is as follows:

Methodology and Technology
Academia
Beyond Academia
Social embeddedness

The Journal of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages shall include papers focusing on broader theoretical and technological issues in all fields of LCTL's along with reports about research and teaching in academia, at both the K-12 and collegiate levels. Also to be included are papers addressing research and teaching in government and industry and issues of a broader social environment, ranging from heritage communities to advancing LCTLs in federal initiatives and legislation inthe USA.  

Deadline: While submissions are welcome at any point, only manuscripts received by November 1, 2016 will be considered for the Spring 2016 issue of the journal.

 

Besides the Journal Editor, the process of selecting material for publication is overseen by the Advisory Editorial Board, which consists of the foremost scholars, advocates, and practitioners of LCTL pedagogy.  The members of the Board represent diverse linguistic and geographical categories, as well as the academic, government, and business sectors.
 

Journal of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages


Volume 16, Fall 2014

  • Corrective Feedback in Classrooms at Different Proficiency Levels —A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language - Liu Li
  • Errors in the Production of Adult Early and Late Bilinguals - Teresa Lee
  • Teachers’ and Non-Teachers’ Perceptions of a Chinese Learner’s Oral Performances - Guangyan Chen
  • Loss of Culture, Loss of Language: An Afghan-American Community - Farid Saydee
  • The Development of a National Curriculum Guide for Persian: Themes, Genres, Standards-based Goals, and Models - Nicole Mills and Pardis Minuchehr
  • Korean Language Teachers in Higher Education in North America: Profile, Status and More - Hye-Sook Wang

Volume 15, Spring 2014

  • Teaching Norwegian to beginners: Six principles to guide lesson planning - Anna Krulatz, Sør-Trøndelag University College
  • Informal Language Learning and Self-Instruction: The Learning Ecosystem of Learners of Macedonian - Biljana Belamarić Wilsey, North Carolina State University
  • Developing Linguistic and Professional Competence: Business Ukrainian On-line - Alla Nedashkivska
  • Content-based Persian language instruction at the University of Maryland: A field-report - Ali Reza Abasi, University of Maryland
  • Foreign Language Speaking Anxiety: A Study of Chinese Language Learners - Han Luo, Northwestern University
  • The Arabic Language Fog of War: Exploring Iraq War Veterans’ Motivations to Study Arabic Language and Culture Post-Deployment - Jennifer Nichols, Kenyon College
  • Meso-American Languages: An Investigation of Variety, Maintenance, and Implications for Linguistic Survival - Ransom Gladwin, Valdosta State University

Volume 14, Fall 2013

  • Variation among heritage speakers: Sequential vs. simultaneous bilinguals - Teresa Lee, University of Virginia
  • Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages - Masako Nunn, California State University, San Bernardino
  • Effectiveness of deep, blended language learning as measured by oral proficiency and course evaluation - Francois Victor Tochon, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • A Language Socialization Approach to Uzbek Language Learning - Baburhan Uzum, Sam Houston State University
  • Language classroom risk-taking behavior in a performed culture-based program - Stephen D. Luft, Ohio State University

Volume 13, Spring 2013

  • LCTL teachers’ assessment knowledge and practices: An exploratory study - Megan Montee, Aileen Bach, Anne Donovan, Lynn Thompson
  • Survey of Digital Materials for Teaching Less Commonly Taught Languages Barbara Blankenship and Thomas J. Hinnebusch UCLA Language Materials Project - Barbara Blankenship, Thomas J. Hinnebusch
  • Cognitive Perspective in SLA: Pedagogical Implications for Enhancing Oral Proficiency in Foreign Languages - Serafima Gettys, Iwona Lech
  • Making Vocabulary Corporeal: Arabic Learners, Vocabulary Development, & arabiCorpus - Amy Johnson, Mike Raish
  • The signal and comprehension approach: decoding and meaning building - Rajaa Aquil
  • Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) Students’ Lexical Tonal Development: An Investigation of Tonal Production and Awareness of Tonal Categories - Li Jin

Volume 9, Fall 2010

  • Enhanced Input in LCTL Pedagogy - Marilyn S. Manley, Rowan University
  • Development of a Computer-Based Workshop to Foster Language Assessment Literacy - Katherine Riestenberg, Francesca Di Silvio, Anne Donovan, Margaret E Malone, Center for Applied Linguistics
  • The Use of English in the Chinese Language Classroom: Perspectives from American College Students -Henrietta Yang, Morehouse College
  • "I Got the Point Across and that is What Counts". Transcultural versus (?) Linguistic Competence in Language Teaching -Shobna Nijhawan, New York University
  • The More Things Change: A Learner's Perspective on Learning Another Arabic Dialect - Elizabeth M. Bergman, Miami University of Ohio
  • Heritage Motivation, Identity and the Desire to Learn Arabic in U.S. Early Adolescents - Amanda Lanier Temples, Georgia State University

Volume 8, Spring 2010

  • Business Communiction in Less Commonly Taught Languages: Teaching Suggestions Through Discourse Analysis - Glaucia V. Silva, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Denise Santos, The University of Reading, UK
  • Addressing the Language Description Deficit - M. Ali Bolgun, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center
  • Adverbs as a Wor Category in Kinyakyusa - Amani Lusekelo, Dar es Salaam University College of Education
  • The Production of Turkish Relative Clauses in Second Language Acquisition: Overcoming Student Difficulties - Anjel Toczu, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center
  • Korean as a Heritage Language in the U.S. University Classroom - Hyun-Sook Kang, Illinois State University
    A Curriculum for Teaching Indonesian in Classes with Diverse Learners - Maria Carreira, California State University, Long Beach
    Juliana Wijaya, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Incorporating Language Learning Into the Academic Setting: A Practical Example at Harvard University - Charles Owu-Ewie, Ohio University, Athens

Volume 7, Fall 2009

  • Who Studies Language and Why?: A Cross-Language Survey of First-Year College-Level Language Learners - Kathryn M. Howard, University of Pennsylvania, Rachel R. Reynolds, Drexel University & Julia Deak, University of Pennsylvania
  • Reasons Students Take Courses in less Commonly Taught Language and More Commonly Taught Languages - Dianna Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sally Sieloff Magnan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michele Back, University of California-Riverside & Paula Garrett-Rucks, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • An Analysis of Student Evaluations of Native and Non-Native Korean Foreign Language Teachers - Julie Damron, Brigham Young University
  • Increasing Assessment Literacy among LCTL Instructors through Blended Learning - Victoria C. Nier, Center for Applied Linguistics, Anne E. Donovan, Center for Applied Linguistics, & Margaret E. Malone, Center for Applied Linguistics
  • Using Technology to Make a Professional Development Effective and Cost-Effective: The JOINT Online Course Program for Japanese Language Teachers - Tekeshi Sengiku, Gettysburg College, Yasu-Hiko Tohsaku, University of California-San Diego, Eiko Ushida, University of California-San Diego, Susan Schmidt, Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese
  • ARIDA: An Arabic Inter-Language Database and its Applications: A Pilot Study - Ghazi Abuhakema, The College of Charleston, Anna Feldman, Montclair State University, & Eileen Fitzpatrick, Montclair State University

Volume 6, Spring 2009

  • Arabic: Meeting the Challenges - Elizabeth M. Bergman, Arizona State University
  • Teaching Accurate Translation at Word Level - Alexander Burak, University of Florida
  • Teaching Russian Grammar Interactively: The Case System - Rimma Garn, University of California-Davis
  • The Keyimage Method of Learning Sound-Symbol Correspondences: A Case Study of Learning Written Khmer - Elizabeth Lavolette, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Retention of Katakana as Foreign Scripts: The Effects of Mnemonics and Spatial Ability - Sachiko Matsunaga, California State University-Los Angeles
    Internet-Assisted Language Learning (IALL) and Developing Arabic Proficiency - Rabia Bajwa, Georgetown University

Volume 5, Spring 2008

  • 2007 NCOLCTL Keynote Presentation - Ambassador Robert Finn, Liechtenstein Institute of the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton
  • Survival Strategies: LCTLs in Context - Marilyn S. Manley, Rowan University
  • Why College students Want to Learn Asian Languages: A Comparative Study of Motivational Factors for the Selections of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese - Jack Jinghui Liu, California State University-Fullerton, Setsue Shibata, California State University-Fullerton
  • Proficiency Testing and Language Teaching: Russian and Polish - Rimma Garn, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Active Learning through Materials Development: A Project for the Advanced L2 Classroom - Katrina Daly Thompson, University of California-Los Angeles
  • Is ‘msonge’ a House? Visualizing a Novel in the L2 Classroom: The Case of Swahili - Charles Bwenge, University of Florida
  • Teaching Pragmatic Particles in the LCTL Classroom - Faizah Sari, University of Alabama

Volume 4, Spring 2007

  • Innovations in language Learning: The Oregon Chinese Flagship Model - Carl Falsgraf, University of Oregon, Madeline K. Spring, University of Oregon
  • Foreign Languages Surviving and Thriving in Conventional University Settings: Implications for Less Commonly Taught Languages - Elizabeth B. Bernhardt, Stanford University
  • Teaching Speech Arts - Margo Milleret, University of New Mexico
  • Endangered Language Documentation and Transmission - D. Victoria Rau, Providence University-Taiwan, Meng-Chien Yang, Providence University-Taiwan
  • Maa-Neu Dong, National Museum of Natural Science-Taiwan Are We There Yet? - Ray T. Clifford, Brigham Young University
    Fostering of Less Commonly Taught Language Initiatives- The Minnesota Experience - Leonard Anthony Polakiewicz, University of Minnesota

Volume 3, Spring 2006

  • Opening Remarks: NCOLCTL Annual Meeting ‘05 - Gilles Bousquet, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Why Students in the U.S. are Learning Arabic: A Study of Motivation at the College-Level - Paula M. Winke, Michigan State University
    Heather D. Weger-Guntharp, Georgetown University
  • College Heritage Language Speakers’ Perceptions of Heritage Languages and Identity - Jingjing Qin, Northern Arizona University
  • Models of Integrating Content and Language Learning - Jiaying Howard, Monterey Institute of International Studies
  • A Retrospective and a Look into the Future 2005 NCOLCTL Walton Award Acceptance Speech Dora Johnson, Center for Applied Linguistics

Volume 2, Spring 2005

  • The Global Professional - Gilles Bousquet, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • The Privilege of the Less Commonly Taught Languages: Linking Literacy and Advanced L2 Capacities - Heidi Byrnes, Georgetown University
  • An Analysis of Learner Motivation of Less Commonly Taught Languages - Junko Ueno, Union College
  • Social Bilingualism and FL Teaching: The Case of Catalan - Amalia Llombart-Huesca, University of Redlands
  • Meeting the Standards for Foreign Language Learning through an Internet-Based Newspaper Project: Case Studies of Advanced-Level Japanese Learners - Miyuki Fukai, Columbia University
  • Why We Need Each Other: 2004 NCOLCTL Walton Award Acceptance Speech - Laurel Rasplica Rodd, University of Colorado

Volume 1, Spring 2004

  • Do Background Variables Predict Students’ Scores on a Japanese Placement Test? Implications for Placing Heritage Language Learners - Kimi Kondo-Brown, University of Hawaii-Manoa
  • Code-Switching among Trilingual Montrealers: French, English, and a Heritage Language. 

    Ephie Konidaris - McGill University

  • An Ethnographic Study of Chinese Heritage Language Education and Technological Innovations. 

    Minjuan Wang, San Diego State University

  • On-line Delivery for Serbo-Croatian (Bosniac, Croatian, Serbian): Tailoring Technology to the Learner. Danko Sipka, Arizona State University

  • Gender Representation in Elementary Level, African Language Textbooks. Antonia Folarin Schleicher, University of Wisconsin-Madison & Kristi Hobson, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • Arabic Instructors’ Attitudes on Communicative Language Teaching (CLT). Deniz Gokcora, University of Minnesota
    Evrim Eveyik-Aydin, University of Minnesota

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